Category Archives: Quickie

Reblog: My talk at Franciscan

As many of you know, there is a speaking component to my writing ministry.  Translation, I don’t just write articles.  I am a full-time teacher at Bishop O’Connell High School, and I also occasionally give talks.  If you want a full list of the talks and other articles by me, check out the “More by Matthew” tab at the top of the page.  

 

Anyway, last fall, I was privileged to give a talk at Franciscan University in Steubenville, Ohio for a symposium they hosted entitled “Pope Francis’s Vision for the Renewal of the Church.”  The symposium included several major speakers, including Ralph Martin, Eduardo Echeverria, and Fr. Robert Spitzer, S.J.  There were also several smaller breakout sessions with talks.  

 

Mine was one of the smaller talks.  It went great, but I wanted to put my thoughts down in a more formal format.  So I wrote them up as an article and submitted it to Homiletic and Pastoral Review, where I write book reviews.  The article was published a couple weeks ago, and I wanted to share it with you guys!  

 

If you want to watch the big speeches, or at least part of them, they were featured on EWTN’s “On Location” series (part 1 is here, part 2 is here).  

 

I’m heading back to Franciscan this October to give a talk at the 25th Anniversery Conference for the Society for Catholic Social Scientists.  That talk will look at the historiography of Warren H. Carroll (I reviewed one of his books on this blog a few years back).  

 

If you are interested in booking me as a speaker, check out the “About Me” tab above.  

Mid-year recap

Hi everyone,

 

It’s been too long since I posted.  I have good reason (sounding tired every time I say that).

First, the articles.  Those of you who are on Facebook and members of the Quidquid Facebook group know all about my recent articles published throughout the year, including the ones published through Those Catholic Men.  Many of these post continue the mission of this blog, namely that they are works of Catholic apologetics.  Two of the articles look at the Inquisition and one examines the Galileo controversy.  I recently published one that is more centered on recent eruptions of violence in our nation, less on Catholic apologetics, but it should interest readers of this blog.

 

So there’s one reason I’ve been away from the blog.

 

Another exciting one is because my wife and I were planning a trans-Atlantic trip to England.  We both submitted paper proposals to the 2016 Tolkien Seminar in Leeds, UK; both were accepted, and we gave our talks at the beginning of July.  Unfortunately, my wife’s talk was not recorded, but mine was, and you can watch it here.  It was a great trip (albeit a bit stressful, as all traveling is), and it was great to talk to people interested in one of the greatest writers of the last century and (maybe) even evangelize a little.

 

So that’s the other reason. . .

 

Hey, did you know today’s the feast of St. Martha?  That’s right, she has her own feast day.  AND there’s a Quidquid article on her and her sister Mary which you can read to tide you over until the next blog post which will hopefully be sooner than. . . seven months from now.

 

Remember, if you have any questions about the Faith, what the Church teaches on something, or an objection to the Catholic Church, ask away!  See the top of the blog for how to do that.

 

 

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Reflection: Christmas Eve 2015

Dear “Quidquid” readers,

 

I hope that this Advent season has been one of spiritual growth and grace.  Too often we get bogged down in the preparations for Christmas, the shopping and tree hunting, the decorating and the baking, that we forget the most important reason for this season: to prepare for Christmas.  I mean, of course, Christmas within our hearts, preparing our lives for the coming of Christ, which is what we celebrate with this great feast. 

 

How blessed we are, that our Christ has come! 

 

It has been a long, busy while since I posted anything here, and that is gravely unfortunate.  I have been swamped, as always seems to be the case.  Here’s a rundown of what’s been up. 

 

Most excitingly, Jacob Thomas was born on November 10.  He’s quite the cutie, with is big ol’ eyes and squishy face. 

 

See?  So he’s been taking up a lot of time.

 

I have been writing, of course, just. . . not here.  I had articles published on Catholic Exchange (one on Pope St. Nicholas the Great, written in the midst of taking care of the newborn and my wife; the other on some books to read for Advent and Christmas).  More excitedly, I had my first article published on Those Catholic Men.  It is about the Inquisition, answering some objections to it.  That was a big hit, and even appeared for a couple days on the homepage of Newadvent.org.  I’m set up to write an article for them every month, so keep an eye out for that. 

 

Up for a little spiritual reflection?  Ok, here ya go. 

 

Today is the feast of Sts. Adam and Eve.  Yes, that Adam and that Eve, our first parents, who through their sin brought sin to the rest of the human race.  They lost us the preternatural gifts.  They lost us (for a time) the gift of supernatural grace.  They wounded our human nature. 

 

So why are they saints? 

 

Remember the key thing about being a saint.  It isn’t that they were perfect; it’s that they must have, at some point in their 900+ years of life, regretted their actions.  I don’t mean regretted in a mere I-shouldn’t-do-that way.  I mean deep, painful contrition.  What Scripture can I point to as evidence?  There isn’t much about Adam and Eve in the Bible after the Fall, and the world gets pretty terrible soon afterwards.  However, we do have that tragic story of Cain and Abel, Adam and Eve’s first two sons.  Cain killed Abel out of jealousy.  God favored Abel’s sacrifice to his older brother’s because Abel gave from his heart.  We must ask, then, where did Abel learn to respect God so well?  Since the first instruction in the Faith happens in the family, and parents are the primary teachers of children, we can point to Abel’s parents, Adam and Eve, as the source for his faith in God. 

 

Something must have changed in the hearts of Adam and Eve.  They must have felt contrition and repentance.  Imagine knowing you did something wrong, and that you needed forgiveness for your sins.  But there is no confession.  You have no baptism or access to the gift of sanctifying grace.  Sin is a burden for us when we can go to confession whenever we want (to an extent, of course, since priests have schedules, as do we); imagine having to bear a sin for centuries without sacrificial confession.  Not too pleasant, is it. 

 

One of the early Church Fathers (I can’t remember which) made a great allusion to Adam’s repentance.  He wrote that when Christ came to the Limbo of the Just, so Hell, the first soul to meet Him was Adam, who ran to meet his Lord first, he who sinned first, because he remembered the sound of God’s feet walking in the Garden. 

 

Adam and Eve are saints for the same reason anyone is a saint: turning away from the darkness towards eternal light in Christ.

 

In Christ we have a new creation, with Him as our New Adam.  It is supremely fitting that Adam and Eve have their feast day on Christmas Eve.  Their death in sin mars the first Creation; the death of Christ forms the foundation of the new Creation.  The birth of Christ, then, begins the work of our salvation. 

 

May we have the love of God that brought Adam and Eve to repentance this Christmas.  May we always have hearts open to the love flowing from the Sacred Heart of Christ.

 

God bless,

 

Matthew B. Rose

Where is he?

Hey everyone!

Don’t worry, I haven’t forgotten about the Laudato Si series.  In fact, I have the next part almost ready to post!

But I’ve been really busy.

School started, so there’s been all of THAT chaos going on.  Plus there’s Rosebud 2.0 coming in November, so all of that’s been fun.

AND if that wasn’t enough, I’ve also been reading a book to review for Homiletic and Pastoral Review, running a series for young adults at St. Veronica’s in Chantilly, and I had an article published on Catholic Exchange.

I also had the chance to go to Philadelphia with some of my students to see Pope Francis.  We did get to see him Saturday, as he drove into the Festival of Families.  So exciting!  Earlier last week we watched his speech to Congress live.  That was really exciting for me. . . maybe not as much for my students, but definitely for me.  I liked his speeches, at least the one’s I’ve read.  He did clarify some points that he had made in the past and, contrary to what some people say, he hit on some important pro-life points.

Read through his talks, when you get the chance.

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